Restoration Project

University of Trieste - Grigano

Restoration Objective:

This experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of restoring natural coastal Cystoseira sp. beds that have been destroyed or are in decline, and to assess the capability of these species to colonise new areas far from the parental population.

Site Selection Criteria:

Izola is a marine protected area where the rocky shores are wave exposed and characterized by continuous natural populations of C. barbata and C. compressa, which extend down to 5m in depth. The MNMR is a protected coastal area characterised by karstic limestone shores. At the time of the experiment, no Cystoseira thalli were present within the MNMR.

Cause Of Decline:

In the Mediterranean Sea, the genus Cytoseira is widely distributed in shallow sublittoral waters. The complex morphology of Cytoseira kelps provides habitat for attachment of benthic fauna, and allows an epiphytic stratification in relation to light, sediment and hydrodynamic gradients. In the gulf of Trieste, Cystoseira sp. beds have declined following severe damage by anthropogenic disturbances.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Multiple

Scientific Paper

Algal transplantation as a potential tool for artificial reef management and environmental mitigation

A. Falace, E. Zanelli, G. Bressan, , Bulletin of Marine Science, Vol. 78.https://www.researchgate.net/...and_environmental_mitigation

Organisation:

Universita' di Trieste

Site Observations:

Observation Date

1st Mar 2002 – 1st Mar 2003

Action Summary:

Adult thalli of C. barbata and C. compressa were transplanted onto artificial modules in two locations in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea). C. barbata holdfasts were covered in polyurethene foam and placed securely in bricks, while C. compressa holdfasts were attached using arched hooks anchored on cubes of cork, and fitted into the holes of bricks. Growth and survival rates of the transplanted sporophytes were monitored monthly for 1 year and compared with naturally settled sporophytes.

Project Outcomes:

C. barbata in Izola had an 80% survival rate. Both transplanted and naturally settled sporophytes showed a marked seasonal growth pattern, with an increase in their length from winter to early spring, and a decrease from spring to summer. C. compressa transplanted onto the box units had a 25% survival rate. The average length of naturally settled plants increased in spring and decreased from July. All transplanted individuals at Izola immediately reduced in size relative to controls. Despite the loss of thalli in storms at NMMR, C. compressa thalli survived on 45% of the natural blocks and the final survival rate of C. barbata was 57% on polymat-box units and ~87% on rocky blocks.

Nature of Disturbance:

At MNMR, some days after transplantation, C. compressa thalli that settled on natural blocks were grazed by Paracentrotus lividus and Sarpa salpa. Additionally, multiple anomalous storms occurred during the study period, causing the loss of many thalli.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Multiple

Indicator Data:

Indicator:

Ending Value:

Starting Value:

Area

0.01133
m2
0.01982
m2
Transplant Info:
Adherence Method:Preattached Substrate
Life Stage:Adult
Costings:
Cost Currency:USD

Observation Date

1st Mar 2002 – 1st Mar 2003

Action Summary:

Adult thalli of C. barbata and C. compressa were transplanted onto artificial modules in two locations in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea). C. barbata holdfasts were covered in polyurethene foam and placed securely in bricks, while C. compressa holdfasts were attached using arched hooks anchored on cubes of cork, and fitted into the holes of bricks. Growth and survival rates of the transplanted sporophytes were monitored monthly for 1 year and compared with naturally settled sporophytes.

Project Outcomes:

C. barbata in Izola had an 80% survival rate. Both transplanted and naturally settled sporophytes showed a marked seasonal growth pattern, with an increase in their length from winter to early spring, and a decrease from spring to summer. C. compressa transplanted onto the box units had a 25% survival rate. The average length of naturally settled plants increased in spring and decreased from July. All transplanted individuals at Izola immediately reduced in size relative to controls. Despite the loss of thalli in storms at NMMR, C. compressa thalli survived on 45% of the natural blocks and the final survival rate of C. barbata was 57% on polymat-box units and ~87% on rocky blocks.

Nature of Disturbance:

At MNMR, some days after transplantation, C. compressa thalli that settled on natural blocks were grazed by Paracentrotus lividus and Sarpa salpa. Additionally, multiple anomalous storms occurred during the study period, causing the loss of many thalli.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Multiple

Indicator Data:

Indicator:

Ending Value:

Starting Value:

Area

0.02494
m2
0.05533
m2
Transplant Info:
Adherence Method:Preattached Substrate
Life Stage:Adult
Source:Wild
Costings:
Cost Currency:USD