Restoration Project

Pusan National University - Namhae-gun

Restoration Objective:

This study aimed to estimate the amount of carbon sequestered by seaweeds, with the view of promoting the use of seaweed farms as carbon sinks. The goal of the CO2 Coastal Removal Belt (CCRB) was to establish both natural and man-made plant communities in the coastal region of southern Korea that will accomplish CO2 removal in the manner of a forest and which can be implemented along various spatial–temporal scales.

Site Selection Criteria:

An artificial reef populated by abundant seaweeds was chosen as a reference site. The longline system was built in coastal waters on the southern coast of Korea.

Cause Of Decline:

Nearly 0.7 million tonnes of carbon are removed from the sea each year within commercially harvested seaweeds. Although seaweed communities occupy only a very small area of the coastal region, they are essential because of their biotic components, valuable ecosystem services, and high primary productivity. The unique three-dimensional habitats of kelp forests also make them biodiversity hotspots in cold waters. Whereas some seaweeds have been cultivated for many centuries, others have traditionally been collected from natural stocks or “wild” populations. Unfortunately, some of these cultivated species are now in decline due, in part, to overharvesting.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Harvest

Scientific Paper

Installing kelp forests/seaweed beds for mitigation and adaptation against global warming: Korean Project Overview

I.K. Chung, J.H. Oak, J.A. Lee, Kim Shin, J. G., K.S. Park, , ICES Journal of Marine Science, Vol. 70.https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fss206

Organisation:

Pusan National University

Site Observations:

Observation Date

1st Jul 2009 – 1st Jul 2010

Action Summary:

A long line midwater rope-culture technique was used to culture sporophytes of Ecklonia cava and Ecklonia stolonifera. The cultivation facility was comprised of “longline”-type horizontal ropes held in place at 3–5m deep by a series of buoys, each of which was linked at it's end to a concrete block. Seedling strings were attached to the horizontal ropes.

Lessons Learned:

Contained data on carbon sequestration as well as frond propagation. Used an artificial reef as a reference site.

Project Outcomes:

E. cava and E. stolonifera plants grew steadily between July 2009 and May 2010 before those rates began to decline gradually in June. After transplanting in July 2009, E. cava bore 92 vs. 103 fronds m−1 for E. stolonifera. Those respective densities decreased to 54 and 58 in December 2009 before rising to 81 and 109 in May 2010. This increase in density may have been due to the growth of young fronds that matured under suitable conditions as well as the outgrowth of fronds from new holdfast propagation. The carbon sink per 100 m of rope was 43.5 kg C for E. cava and 88.9 kg C for E. stolonifera. They estimated that based on increments in biomass during the 22 months, 10 t CO2ha per year could be drawn down in the seaweed CDM by these perennial brown algae.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Harvest

Area of Restoration (In Square Metres)

10,000

Indicator Data:

Indicator:

Ending Value:

Starting Value:

Wet Weight Kelp

54.87364621
g WW/m2
20.2166065
g WW/m2
Transplant Info:
Life Stage:Juveniles
Costings:
Cost Currency:USD

Observation Date

1st Jul 2009 – 1st Jul 2010

Action Summary:

A long line midwater rope-culture technique was used to culture sporophytes of Ecklonia cava and Ecklonia stolonifera. The cultivation facility was comprised of “longline”-type horizontal ropes held in place at 3–5m deep by a series of buoys, each of which was linked at it's end to a concrete block. Seedling strings were attached to the horizontal ropes.

Lessons Learned:

Contained data on carbon sequestration as well as frond propagation. Used an artificial reef as a reference site.

Project Outcomes:

E. cava and E. stolonifera plants grew steadily between July 2009 and May 2010 before those rates began to decline gradually in June. After transplanting in July 2009, E. cava bore 92 vs. 103 fronds m−1 for E. stolonifera. Those respective densities decreased to 54 and 58 in December 2009 before rising to 81 and 109 in May 2010. This increase in density may have been due to the growth of young fronds that matured under suitable conditions as well as the outgrowth of fronds from new holdfast propagation. The carbon sink per 100 m of rope was 43.5 kg C for E. cava and 88.9 kg C for E. stolonifera. They estimated that based on increments in biomass during the 22 months, 10 t CO2ha per year could be drawn down in the seaweed CDM by these perennial brown algae.

Key Reasons For Decline:

Harvest

Area of Restoration (In Square Metres)

10,000

Indicator Data:

Indicator:

Ending Value:

Starting Value:

Wet Weight Kelp

111.1913357
g WW/m2
11.55234657
g WW/m2
Transplant Info:
Life Stage:Juveniles
Costings:
Cost Currency:USD